Saturday, August 24, 2013

Fast track to performance gains

Flow of the workout
Today's workout (track): 1 mile tempo, 12 x 100M, 1.25 mile cool-down = 3.1 miles

This morning I headed out early to the local track to run intervals and tempos. I took the Virratas out for their first run, and thought they responded well to fast pacing. My plan was to run one mile at 5K race pace, which I'd follow with intervals and a cool-down run.

The track had a few walkers and a couple of runners when I arrived. I got started quickly on my tempo warm up and found a pace that felt hard, but sustainable. I locked into that pace for four laps, guided by perceived effort. Along the way, I passed everyone including the other two runners on track. After last Sunday's low point of the race, when I was being passed left and right around mile five, it felt good to be the one who was doing the passing. I averaged 8:18 for the mile.

Next, I ran a set of 100 meter repeats, averaging 6:40 per mile. I was surprised when I later looked at heart rate data and saw that I'd averaged between 74-80% of MAX. Knowing that, I can probably get my pace down to 6:25, while still staying under 90% MAX. However, I'll probably keep it to 8 x 100's for that session.

I finished the workout with a 1.25 mile cool down, run at a moderate (9:21) pace. In total, it wasn't a lot of distance, but the intensity made up for that. I'm planning a long run tomorrow, either on the Bethpage path, or another route that will facilitate a 6+ mile distance better than my neighborhood roads. My performance has improved greatly for runs between 3-3.5 miles. It will be interesting to see how my pacing holds up, when I double that length tomorrow.

2 comments:

  1. WOw! 8:18! congrats! and you 100's got faster too!
    It's making me wonder if I'm doing the right thing by training according to HR now. But I'm so envious of everyone running with a low rate. I think I'll stick with it for now.

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    Replies
    1. I'm the last person who should be suggesting theories about managing heart rate, but it is possible that your physiology can support a higher MAX. I knew a runner in his mid-40's who claimed a training HR of over 200.

      But why debate the verifiable? You should talk to your doctor (or cardiologist if you have one) to see what they think your range should be.

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